I Got a Bunny for Easter, Now What?

albuquerque rabbit vet

albuquerque rabbit vetI Got a Bunny for Easter, Now What?

You are a new bunny parent, congratulations! You are probably wondering what to do now. What kind of veterinary treatments does my new rabbit need?

Spay and Neuter

A rabbit can have a littler every 30 days and can get pregnant within minutes of giving birth. There is a reason they say “breed like bunnies”. It is important that you get your rabbit spayed or neutered. Beyond the unwanted litters, spaying and neutering also protects females from uterine cancer and helps their mental health.

Vaccinations

In the United States, rabbits are not required to get vaccinations. If you are traveling to Europe or the UK and bringing your rabbit, talk to your vet about getting the appropriate vaccinations.

Specialized Vets

Not all small animal vets are specialized to work with rabbits. Make sure the vet you chose is able to treat rabbits. At Vetco we are able to treat the well animal, and surgical, needs of your pet rabbit.

 

Adopt a Guinea Pig Month

Guinea Pig Vetco

Guinea Pig VetcoAdopt a Guinea Pig Month

March is Adopt a Guinea Pig month. If you have ever thought about getting a pet Guinea Pig, or Cavy, this is a great time to do it! Much like cats and dogs, the best way to get your new pet is to adopt them. Guinea Pigs are rescued too. Usually they are rescued by way of a pet owner turning them in because they no longer want them as pets. Many shelters will have Guinea Pigs in their facilities.

With proper preparation Guinea Pigs are easy to take care of, and make great pets.

Here is a great pdf from the ASPCA about how to care for your Guinea Pig. guinea-pig-pdf-thumb

Food

  • Grass pellets
  • Fresh Hay
  • Fresh fruit and Vegetables

Shelter

  • Large cage or enclosure
  • They like to live in groups with other Guinea Pigs
  • Bedding
  • Sleeping Cave

Guinea Pigs are fun and social creatures. They love to play with other animals and they love to play with people. They make fun grunting and squealing sounds when they are excited and they rarely bite. They make excellent pets for families. With proper care, your Guinea Pig can be a great part of your family.

Like all pets, Guinea Pigs need veterinary care. Bring them into Vetco for their annual checkup. If you think your Guinea Pig is sick because they are:

  • Losing hair
  • No appetite
  • Dehydrated
  • Diarrhea

Bring them in for an evaluation immediately.

 

Chicken Health: Impacted Crop

albuquerque chicken vet

albuquerque chicken vetChicken Health: Impacted crop

Your chickens digestion starts in the crop. The crop is a part of the oesophagus and found at the base of the neck. If you feel it, you can sometimes feel food contents inside it.

Crop impaction is when food does not move from the crop into the stomach. This can be caused by a blockage preventing the food from passing, or a neuromuscular disease like Mareks disease where normal muscle contractions fail and the food is not moved down the oesophagus.

An impacted crop can be a serious condition.

Symptoms

  • lethargy
  • dull
  • no appetite
  • firm impacted crop

Treatment

  • Giving fluids
  • Surgery to remove the blockage
  • Antibiotics if there is an infection

If you are concerned your chicken has an impacted crop, bring them into the vet for an evaluation. Albuquerque Vetco treats chicken!